Contributors

Eddie is a first year PhD. student at the University of Minnesota , Twin Cities researching embodied technologies, applied research qualitative and quantitative methods, composition studies, and risk and crisis intercultural communication.


Jeremy David Johnson completed his PhD in Communication Arts & Sciences at Penn State University in January 2018. His writing on algorithms and networked culture has appeared in the edited volumes Theorizing Digital Rhetoric and Ancient Rhetorics and Digital Networks, as well as the journal Argumentation & Advocacy. See more at http://jeremydavidjohnson.com or @jeremydigitalus on Twitter.


Peter is a passionate, high school English teacher who loves pushing his students and himself to achieve at a greater level.1 Articles


Stephanie R. Larson is a PhD candidate in Composition and Rhetoric in the department of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is the current Assistant Director of the First-Year Writing Program.2 Articles


Jim Brown is Associate Professor of English at Rutgers University-Camden where he also serves as Director of the Digital Studies Center (DiSC). His research addresses the ethical and rhetorical underpinnings of computational environments.


Jason Markins is a PH.D. candidate at Syracuse University in the Composition and Cultural Rhetorics department. He studies the history of the arts and crafts in relation to multimodal composition and rhetorics.


Jennifer is currently a composition instructor at the University of Washington. She will complete her doctoral work this spring, focusing on the role students’ metacognitive practices and confidence play in writing success in college--especially for multilingual and non-traditional students.


Karl is a Ph.D. student at the University of Georgia. His focus areas are digital humanities, rhetoric and composition, and comics studies. He gets to read and write comics and play video games and call it research. Jealous?


Brielle is a PhD candidate at Middle Tennessee State University. Her interests include disability rhetoric, digital rhetoric, and the rhetoric of pop-culture.


Emma Lee Guthrie, a doctoral student in Bowling Green State University's Rhetoric and Writing program, is interested in arts-based pedagogies and research methods, digital rhetorics-- especially writing for social networking sites, writing transfer, and imposter phenomenon.1 Articles


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