2016 C&W Reviews

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Thank you to all the reviewers and editors who contributed to making the Computers & Writing 2016 Reviews section possible. The theme for this year’s conference was “Crossing Wires: Reaching Across Campus, Between Disciplines, and Into Communities.” Featured here are reviews of some of the many sessions that explored how Computers & Writing can expand its horizons in regards to scholarship and pedagogy. Some topics that emerged from the conference ranged from embodiment and social media research, participatory and user design in social justice and access projects, and the exploration of what Digital Humanities means in particular disciplines and institutions. Leave comments on the review posts and also use the #cwcon hashtag on Twitter and Facebook to keep the conversation from the conference moving. To see the full conference schedule, visit the Computers & Writing 2016 Schedule.

2016 C&W REVIEW TEAM: 

Brandy Dieterle, University of Central Florida
Merideth Garcia, University of Michigan
Adrienne Raw, University of Michigan

KN1: Social Media & Writing Instruction
Review by Eric James Stephens

KN3: Crossing the Digital Divide: Engaged Scholarship, Writing, and Technology
Review by Spencer Smith

A1: [Dis]Embodied Kairotic Composing: Snapchat, Indigenous Networks, and Queer Digital Migratory Analysis
Review by Casey Miles

A4: “Beyond a Single Language/Single Modality: Crossing Multimodal/Translingual Pedagogies”
Review by Rick Wysocki

B2: Arguing in Type: On the Rhetoricity of Letterforms
Review by Elizabeth Fleitz

B3: The Ethics and Archives of Doing Social Media Research
Review by John Silvestro

E1: Approaches to Teaching Cultivated Community Spaces Surrounding Games
Review by Daniel Hocutt

F3: From Methods to Resistance: Digital Writing Scholars Crossing Into Digital Humanities Classrooms
Review by Eric James Stephens

G5: Tools for Writing Researchers by Writing Researchers
Review by Spencer Smith

I4: DALN Organizational Meeting; or, The State of the DALN is Strong!
Review by Gavin Johnson

About Author(s)

Brandy Dieterle is a doctoral student in the Texts & Technology program at the University of Central Florida (UCF). At UCF, Brandy has been a graduate student tutor in the University Writing Center and has taught first-year composition courses. As a teacher, Brandy encourages students to think of writing and literacy as both self representation and identity forming. Her research is focused on identity and self representation, gender identity and representation, multimodality and new media, and digital rhetoric.

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